Difficulty Refunding Customers

I have been selling on Amazon for over a decade and have never had this issue happen before, ever.

Starting in July, every customer I refund never ends up getting refunded. I do refund them, but then, poof, it disappears. Due to angry customers, I am now screen grabbing each refund and attaching it to the message I send them. Without fail, they return, saying I am lying to them because the funds are never returned to them. :roll_eyes:

I have contacted seller support each time, and every time they tell me, “Please let the buyer know that they can get a refund for this order after they update their Amazon account with a valid payment method.” It seems statistically impossible for 6 customers in a row to have this problem.

Due to the non help from seller support, I have created an email template to the customers telling them what seller support told me and also including a link to the “How to File an A to Z Claim” page if they actually do have a valid payment method.

Anyone else ever have this issue??

(As an off-topic aside, I can’t tell you how happy I was to find this forum on Google while searching for the A to Z information. I am so glad I can come here now instead of incognito windowing to the NSFE.)

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I think that they just did a massive batch run, as I recently had several non-computer-savvy relatives and friends ask me how to find where their credit card info goes in the birdsnest that is the Amazon user interface.

Minor things like default billing zipcode vs default shipping zipcode seem to being suddenly treated as important, which is hard for people with more than one residence to keep straight.

Maybe one of the credit card companies cracked down on all merchants, due to too many fraud claims.

Glad to have you!

I have not seen this, but I will keep an eye out for it. I mostly notice these things only when someone complains.

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It could possibly be a problem with Amazon being used by hackers to test out stolen credit card numbers. I just had a $1.20 international charge made on a personal credit card this weekend by amazon.mx (I don’t shop or sell on amazon.mx and don’t use personal credit cards for my seller account). The charge was made at 3:00 in the morning and then shortly after credited back. I immediately reported the fraud to Chase and requested a new card, but from reading online seems to be a recent problem… small Amazon charges made and refunded, then a $500+ charge a week or two later, probably after the hackers sell the credit card number.

@JustMe123 … welcome aboard!

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I had the same type thing happen but here in the US. I got a call from the Security Department asking me if I had made a charge for $600 or $700 at some store three states away. Nope, OK, how about $350 here? Nope, OK those were held as possible fraud.

How about the $3.50 at this fast food joint? NOPE.

OK, that one made it through, I’m cancelling it now and I’ll send out a new card.

He told me that they now use random number generators and click until one works.

That was a LONG week since it was my primary business card and I was doing a lot of restocks.

I may not have even noticed the charge if it had been done on the .com site (I tend to buy a lot on Amazon LOL). I have alerts set up for any international charge on all my credit cards, so the .mx charge from Mexico triggered the notification so I caught it before any real damage was done.

Years ago we had a hacker on one of my retail websites use a script that submitted hundreds of credit card transactions a minute testing card numbers to see what went through. Although 95% of the cards were declined, we ended up with $6K in authorization fees (charged every time a credit card transaction is submitted). This was before gateways had all of the fraud detection triggers in place that they do now… it was a mess and gave me a small glimpse at how these hackers test and obtain individual’s credit card numbers. One would think that Amazon would be better at stopping those sort of hackers and not allow their websites to be compromised in that fashion. :smirk: