Does eBay allow dropshipping?

Q for eBay sellers: I (actually my mother) have found people selling my work on eBay for a considerable markup. They don’t have the physical items, they’ve just skimmed the Amazon listing.

I get the scam: They sell, then order from me and dropship to their customers, pocketing the difference. I usually ignore this stuff, but if my MOM could find it - it concerns me. Esp. with the ridiculous markup.

But if eBay won’t do anything about it…not sure whether to pursue or not.

ETA: Answered my own question with the google machine - they do. Still. Not sure what my recourse is.

ETAA(?): However, listing an item on eBay and then purchasing the item from another retailer or marketplace that ships directly to your customer is not allowed on eBay. - Excellent. Will report these.

Not allowed

https://www.ebay.com/help/selling/posting-items/setting-postage-options/drop-shipping?id=4176

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This has been a common practice on Ebay since the beginning of Ebay.

I have never heard of anyone who lost their ability to sell on Ebay because of it.

I doubt if it is actually costing you many sales. On the whole, Ebay buyers are price sensitive, and for the few who are not, you will be paid to dropship.

There is the risk of cheapening your brand and designs, but short of trademark infringement and a badass lawyer to enforce your trademark there is not much you can do.

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This isn’t my concern, and it’s typically why I ignore it. My concern is customers realizing they paid way more for it on eBay, then leaving me a ■■■■■■ review because they could have bought it cheaper. Even my Mom thought one of the eBay sellers was me.

Thank you - I googled and found that, should have done that first, but came right here knowing you all would know!

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This isn’t my concern, and it’s typically why I ignore it. My concern is customers realizing they paid way more for it on eBay, then leaving me a ■■■■■■ review because they could have bought it cheaper. Even my Mom thought one of the eBay sellers was me.

You could view it as those scummy sellers doing some free marketing for you. :grin: What if you put a note in the package when you ship it? Something like -

Hello (addressee name),

I am (your name), the maker of the handmade (item name) you ordered. I hope you enjoy my work!

I see you are not listed as the buyer of record on this order, and I want to alert you to a potential scam, in case you placed your order with an unauthorized seller. Some online sellers create listings at inflated prices on sites such as eBay, with the intent of purchasing the item elsewhere at full retail price and selling it to the unsuspecting customer at a heavy mark-up.

If you were an unfortunate victim of this, you would have ordered from the Amazon/eBay /xxx merchant at an inflated price, and they would have turned around and placed an order with me at the full retail price, and asked me to ship the item to you.

The typical price you should expect to pay for (item purchased) is in the $xx - $xx range. If you were charged significantly more than that, you might consider asking your seller for a refund/return.

'~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

You can stick it to the bad seller, protect your reputation with the buyer, possibly gain them as a new customer, and maybe even get the bad seller kicked off eBay if the customer is angry enough to report them. There’s some potential risk involved, if the buyer tells their seller about your note and he gets mad at you.

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I sell/manufacture pesticides, they are sort of regulated by the government. I have a Trademark. There is this guy on eBay that is marking up my product by nearly 100% and drop shipping it on eBay from Amazon. I had our attorney reach out to eBay and ask it to be taken down. eBay’s reply in essence was ‘so sue us…’

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But…wouldn’t this encourage the actual Amazon buyer of record–the scammer–to then return it via Amazon to and leave negative feedback and review? :thinking:

It’s a calculated risk, of course. But I’d weigh these factors -

  • Most people who get caught doing something wrong tend to be embarrassed/ashamed and are more likely to slink away quietly than fight and draw more attention to themselves
  • Most people doing this kind of flipping are probably more naive than evil. I imagine many who are drawn in by the promise of easy money don’t realize they’re hurting very real individuals when they cheat people into overpaying
  • Isn’t @LR72 a handmade seller? And don’t they have more control over their returns than the rest of us? If they have the right to refuse them, that could be another lesson for the bad seller to learn.
  • We can respond to negative sellers feedback and explain what really happened
  • Handmade sellers have more control over their PDP too, don’t they? Wouldn’t they have the ability to address a negative review too?

There is a risk, and each person would have to decide for themselves if it’s worth it.

You could also change the line in my letter to read to report the seller to the marketplace where the item was sold, instead of asking for a return/refund. Instead of contacting the seller, go directly over their head to the platform who’s rules they were breaking. I thought this might go over the head of many average buyers though, whereas most would understand ask for a return or refund.

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When I suspect an order is a drop ship from somewhere else, I include an Amazon packing slip with the total circled and a pre-printed thank you for buying from ‘my seller name’ on Amazon. That gives the recipient the information they need without explicit accusations, just in case it is not a drop ship.
Some I know for sure because they are big and I find my scraped listings on Google Shopping.

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Update on this: All 3 sellers I found have removed the listings. And all 3 responded in very (very) broken English. The one my mom yelled at (lol) is in Sri Lanka. So clearly this is a popular thing to do on eBay.

The listings of mine they were drop-shipping were all FBA so nothing I could do to alert the buyers.

I found this on a product from the grocery store - first time ever seeing it.

image

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Fighting the RA crowd.

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Yes, I see this sticker/label a lot on higher-end haircare products and such.

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Now I miss my mom, hell hath no furry like a mothers child scorned.

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I just SMDH - she told me she saw them selling my stuff and send them a long message calling them all sorts of names. Good gravy! LOL I told her I need to sic her on the Etsy shops that copy me haha! She’s from Upstate NY and has no filter. lol

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I resemble that remark, birthed from my mother at Crouse Hinds in Syracuse, New York.

No longer with us, she was shipped back USPS from FL and rests in the city with her parents.

If they are indeed actually managing to sell your products at the inflated price on Ebay. You should go ahead and list your own items on Ebay at an appropriate price. (Maybe even raise your prices across the board if they are managing to sell much at the inflated price.)
The question is are they really managing to sell any of your product or is it just listed to see if they can sell any.

As to what you can do. If they scraped your copyright material (images and text) and are using it on a listing without your consent, then you could report the listing for that.

So a couple years ago I discovered a bunch of listings (on amazon and other platforms) that were using my images to sell their own knock off versions of my products. I could not stop them from selling their own versions but I could make them stop using my images. It was tedious because I had to file complaints against hundreds of separate listings.
It was pretty plain to me that one of those “dropship warehouse” operations that scrapes listings and then offers lists of things to subscribers to populate their Amazon and/or ebay stores had scraped my listings and was offering something similar to what I was selling because there were tons to sellers using the same images and when I went through and knocked them all down they popped back up with different images eventually. About the only thing I have going for my products is that they are made in the USA.

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We have this happen often with our handmade line.
We intentionally ship it in an Amazon box and include all of our information.
We also include a packing slip including the price paid for the item.
They buy from us on Amazon then have it shipped to their buyer from ebay or etsy.
More often than not we get contact from the “recipient” making comment about how they paid $$$
but the invoice says $.
We direct them back to the seller telling them we just fulfilled the order.
This kind of drop shipping is being taught by many of the “gurus” lately.
We have not found a successful way to stop it but we do make sure the buyer knows
the item came from us (our brand) and refer them back to the seller.

I assume this. And I have considered eBay but not sure it’s really a great marketplace for my products.

Screen Shot 2023-04-02 at 9.54.24 AM

^^ This is my current Pixsy count - this is an online service I use to find my images on other sites. It’s maddening but most of it is scraper sites that use the images and text to draw traffic, then (I assume) they flip the website to something else. I rarely act on anything unless I think it’s taking business away from me. Like when I found Lowe’s selling my stuff. Nope!

The eBay listings are gone - I quoted the policy to them and they deleted them right away.

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