Is this new? (too many categories here...didn't see a good one)

Purchased a Gold Necklace for my son’s 30st…got this? Never got this before…it was only 360 bucks?

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That’s very strange.

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and annoying! I searched long and hard to find something I can get delivered tomorrow (Yeah Yeah, late as always) and now have to sit here all day waiting for a driver

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This is the first I’ve ever heard of this. Must be new.

I had an Amazon driver message me for the first time ever via text the other day. He asked that I put my dog away if I have one. LOL

Wish I would have screenshotted it. It’s not there anymore when I click the text link.

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I’ve seen a few mentions of this paradigm over in the NSFE in the last three or four months; I suspect that AMZL leadership has grown weary of footing the bill when their poorly-vetted workforce doesn’t meet muster.

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Yeah and turn on the light. It’s a generic template message and it’s annoying honestly when they are arriving at 1pm, turn on a light?

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$360 jewelry I would think is a “high fraud” category for ecommerce, especially Amazon.

This is a somewhat decent idea, since it more or less 100% confirms that the person who ordered it received the package, and if it does go missing they have scan data that should pinpoint who’s responsible. Signatures are problematic since those can be forged, either by someone at the address, or by a thieving carrier.

Back when I used to use ubereats a lot, I would quite frequently (at least 1 in 5) report orders as not delivered because the lazy driver leaves the order with the doorman despite me putting instructions saying they can’t do that. After a few times of that I would have to give a PIN to the driver for most orders to get the delivery, which was perfect since they could no longer just leave it with someone else. For food delivery that system is perfect since you’re waiting for it if you ordered food, but for packages this seems like there’s going to be some major execution problems.

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You’re right but nothing differentiates what’s in the box / bag. Could be a light switch or a vintage Picasso.

Seems unusual for shipping anything to the primary account holders address. What if this was a gift (it is, I know), and was shipping to the OP’s son’s place? Amazon going to force him to be at home to get his gift.

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Is it TBA I assume?

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Of course there could still be problems not covered by this, but it at least gets rid of MOST INR scams.

And as I said, the execution for this seems problematic since people aren’t typically sitting around waiting for a package. Personally I don’t order anything expensive from Amazon. They do a good job of delivering stuff quick, but when a problem arises they suck nowadays.

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yeah, but the 1500 bucks Generator got thrown in my driveway…now I realize, I bought a few more things to go with the necklace and it totals around $550 all together, but certainly not the first time…a few months ago, I got a $20 FBA delivery…with signature confirmation!!

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no, it actually continues to say “If this is a gift, please forward the pin to the recipient” !!!
It’s an insane idea and if I wasn’t pressed for time I would just refuse delivery rather than sit and wait

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Sounds along the lines of the period where they required signatures on removal orders that were delivered by Amazon drivers; very annoying. A book that didn’t sell for $15, and that if you lost, you’d pay me 50 cents (if I’m lucky) required a signature; a nearly $500 video camera? Left on the front doorstep. That was never announced, and eventually went away.

I guess I could see this level of security on something with a 4-5 digit price tag, but frankly, we ship $300 items, even jewelry (on other platforms) on a fairly regular basis; that’s not even the level where we start thinking anything about it.

ETA: where this might be actually good is on fragile items; I often see the Amazon drivers throwing packages over railings, then shooting the pic through the rails. Having to get a pin would at least make them walk all the way to the door before dropping the package.

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You have to remember that Amazon has a bigger fraud problem than average. Some AI program probably told them that doing this might save money.

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well, the lesson I learned once again…is don’t wait until 2 days before you need something, to go looking for it. For that, I suck up the limited choices, extra cost and this crap. But next time they do this, if I don’t HAVE to have it that day…it will be a failed delivery and I already got it from somewhere else…

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so i all fairness. Got the pin e-mail just now and it comes with tracking. Tracking shows the driver in another town, 50 miles away, stating 3 stops away and a 3 hour delivery window. So…is this coming via armored truck lol?

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Probably should’ve gone to the jewelry store tbh.

I wouldn’t order something online if you absolutely NEED it next day. So many things can go wrong.

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yeah, not the best choice, but when it comes to birthdays and such, I seem to frequently push it another day until I run out of time…and I buy really everything online, house, cars, food…at best I run by and pick up. Who has time for all that :slight_smile:

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How did it go?

And I think the fact that the delivery of this product requires in-person acceptance with pin should be noted upfront, before a Buyer makes the purchase.

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Kind of late to the discussion, but this did happen to us about a year ago when we had ordered an $900 dehumidifier. When the delivery guy showed up at the wrong time, he called us and we provided the 4 digit code to them. They just left the package on the steps. Not sure how this security really works, but we never were required to do it again, even after ordering a $1400 computer item a few months ago.
I believe its probably randomly assigned then their “AI” deducts there may be an issue, but the execution of it, doesn’t seem very “secure” to me.

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